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Friday, February 14, 2014

Valentine's Day special: A great catch!


The boyfriend of a hyperhidrosis blogger (Just A Little Sweat) wrote about what it's like to date someone with hyperhidrosis. Anyone who's frustrated with dating should read this post. If they're worth dating, they will be understanding of your hyperhidrosis. And chances are it won't be as big of a deal to them as it is to you.

Love,
Tiara


Dripping and dancing

I took a break from the iontophoresis, and my hands have been sweating a lot. In fact, during a meeting for work last week, I noticed wet spots on my pants and the carpet. My hands were actually dripping so much that it caused these wet spots.

I need to get back to the iontophoresis.

I am thinking of taking a swing dancing class, but I don't know if I (or my partners) would enjoy it with my dripping wet palms. Hopefully I can get the iontophoresis going quickly. In the meantime, is it acceptable to wear gloves while dancing? Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

Love,
Tiara

Monday, December 30, 2013

New Year's Resolutions: Think Small and Steady

Do you have a New Year's resolution? If you're like me, and like most people, chances are that you will break your resolution. In fact, four out of five people break their New Year’s resolutions—and a third of people break them by February

I finally found a technique that helped me create a positive new habit without too much difficulty. I hope this blog post will equip you to make small but steady positive changes that can help you overcome the negative effects of hyperhidrosis.


The technique I mentioned comes from Dr. B.J. Fogg, a Stanford researcher specializing in behavior change. He sponsors an ongoing experiment called 3 Tiny Habits.  


3 Tiny Habits promises behavior change without relying on willpower or motivation. His goal is to help people learn how habits work. He believes that people can create new habits by changing their environment (your surroundings) and taking baby steps.
The behavior should be

  • ·      Easy
  • ·      Quick
  • ·      Specific
  • ·      Scheduled at a certain time each day or prompted by a trigger
      Once you accomplish a small change, you can build on it to accomplish slightly larger changes. For example, instead of setting the resolution to "lose weight," you could set the more attainable goal of "brushing your teeth every night immediately after dinner" to prevent evening snacking. This action is easy, quick, specific, and prompted by a trigger (finishing dinner.)

What would be a small change to help with the social anxiety that results from hyperhidrosis? The change, to be successful, needs to come from inside you rather than from someone else. But I can suggest the kinds of behavior changes that have worked for me in hopes of inspiring you to come up with your own.

One of the negative effects of hyperhidrosis is hyper-focus on oneself. This impedes one's ability to socialize and build relationships and rapport with other. One tiny habit that might help would be when you meet someone new to notice their eye color. This would help you focus on them rather than your own anxiety. Another tiny habit that could help would be when you meet someone to say "Nice to meet you (repeat their name)." This would help you focus on and remember their name. 

One of the most successful changes I have been able to make is, as my head touches my pillow at bedtime, to say three things I'm grateful for. This helps me focus on what is most important in life and to better appreciate the people around me. It doesn't cure hyperhidrosis, but it is an attitude shift that helps one live better with the condition.

What tiny changes will you make in 2014? Whatever they are and whoever you are, I hope you have a great year.

Love,
Tiara













Friday, July 12, 2013

What if they saw you sweat?

A recent blog post by writer Donald Miller, What if the Temptation to Be Impressive Keeps Us From Connecting? got me thinking. Mr. Miller, author of the Storyline Blog, writes about how he is bored by people who portray themselves as perfect. I believe there's an important lesson here for people with hyperhidrosis and social anxiety. Often when we're so busy trying to hide our sweat, we are unable to connect with others. We may also lose the ability to discern who is a true friend who is worthy of your time and love. (And when I say "worthy," I'm talking about someone's integrity, morals, and originality--not their social standing or wealth.)

In high school, I lived in fear of classmates discovering my hyperhidrosis. I avoided activities where I might need to hold or shake others' hands. At religious services, I would leave for the bathroom in the middle of each service to avoid exchanging the sign of peace. When I won an award for excellence in my sport (surprise, surprise...it was swimming!), I refused to attend the ceremony to accept the trophy because I would need to shake hands. All of this kept me apart from others, alone in a crowd. And it was all because I was afraid I would be made fun of because of my sweat.

My fear of being teased was valid--I had been teased because of my sweat--but I was not able to think this through at the time. If someone is making fun of me because of my sweat, what does it say about them? Now I know that mean people are often hurting on the inside. Ostracizing others is a way to boost yourself at others' expense. Ultimately, the cruelty hurts all involved. People who are at peace with themselves naturally feel compassionate towards others. They are the people you want to know. They are the people who are capable of healthy friendships. They are the people who will accept you for who you are, even if you sweat like a football player eating jalapeno peppers in a sweat lodge. When I think about my high school classmates, I believe there were some who would have been excellent friends who I did not connect with because I was too busy hiding.

Therefore, being honest about your hyperhidrosis will weed out people who lack the compassion and self-love to be a true friend. I'm not saying that you need to tell everyone all the time. But there are some times and places where it's better to be honest. If someone rejects you, yes, of course, it will hurt. But ultimately, the loss is theirs.

Love,
Tiara


Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Slippery grace: Yoga is for people with hyperhidrosis too

Hi everyone, It's been a busy summer so far. I hope everyone is enjoying these long days. I wanted to call your attention to an interesting post, Yoga and Hyperhidrosis, written by the author of hyperhidrosis blog My Life as a Puddle.

I have avoided attending a yoga class for a very long time because of my hyperhidrosis (HH)I worry about sweating all over the yoga mat and leaving puddles on the floor. I also worry about doing positions like downward dog and sliding out of them since my hands are sweaty and have no traction.  
I can relate. Nevertheless, I fell in love with yoga about 15 years ago, despite my sweaty palms and feet.

Sweaty palm spirituality

It took me about 8 years from the first time I wanted to do yoga (back in the 80s when it wasn't nearly as popular in the U.S.) to the time I started doing it regularly. In my first class, the teacher asked us to work with a partner, taking turns holding each others' feet in a pose.  Just thinking about it now makes my feet sweat! At the end of the class, we all sat in a circle meditating and holding hands. Needless to say, the class was less than relaxing. Because the teacher was an exceptionally kind woman (as well as a therapist with her own practice), I called her afterwards to tell her why I wanted to drop out. As is often the case, her reaction to my disclosure was underwhelming. Without skipping a beat, she said, "It's no problem. We don't have to hold hands while we meditate. I appreciate your sharing your perspective."


That was 15 years ago, and I've been doing yoga ever since. As I type this, I think of this wonderful teacher and smile. I hope she knows she made a difference in someone's life.

Quick yoga tips for people with hyperhidrosis

  • Bring a towel to class, and use the towel under your hands during downward dog, plank, and other exercises where you place weight on your hands. No fancy equipment is needed. I find that the thin towels usually found at gyms work the best. 
  • Bring socks in case you do partner exercises
  • If the teacher seems like a discreet and understanding person, talk to him or her privately about any discomfort you might be having due to your hyperhidrosis
  • Use this opportunity to go deep inside yourself, focusing on your breathing and the alignment of your body. You might find that your sweating is reduced by the end of the class. This is almost always the case for me.
  • Be kind and gentle to your body and your spirit.

Love,
Tiara




Monday, May 06, 2013

The spiritual lessons of hyperhidrosis


Thanks to "My Life as a Puddle" for this insightful post about hyperhidrosis and loving life as it is.  This is exactly the kind of conversation we need to be having. I agree that people with hyperhidrosis should seek medical treatment, but at the same time, we need to learn to love ourselves as we are.

Love,
Tiara


Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Iontophoresis fatigue

Trees are rooted in the ground while reaching for the sky. 
Some rights reserved by @Doug88888
I have not been doing iontophoresis as often as before, and my hands are sweaty once again. Tomorrow, I am giving a speech and will need to shake hands. I wish that I had kept up my iontophoresis regimen. One reason I had stopped was that I had small cracks on my hands from winter dryness. I finally found something that helped: Eucerin's Aquaphor cream in a little tub. Now that the dry skin is healed, I need to begin the treatments again.

I went to a memorial service for a friend who died in her early 50s of breast cancer. The service was beautiful and meaningful. Attending the service made me think about what would happen if I died today? Have I lived the life I want to lead? Have I spent enough time with the people I love? Have I worked hard and enjoyed myself?

While I am sad about my friend's passing, I am glad I had the chance to be inspired by a well-lived life. And I am glad that I had a chance to reflect on the bigger picture, for I am much more than sweaty palms and feet, though they are part of who I am.

Love,
Tiara

Friday, March 08, 2013

T-shirt created to block underarm sweat and odor

Billy Thompson, an entrepreneur with hyperhidrosis, invented and manufactured a T-shirt that he claims "blocks underarm sweat and odor." The "Thompson Tee with Hydro-Shield Sweatproof Technology" is available online.

"I’ve fully embraced this role and stepped up to become a face and voice for those folks dealing with this issue. Many of them are in silence," Thompson said, according to The Daily Athenum Online.

For more information, see:

Way to go, Billy!

Love,
Tiara


Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Start-Up Company Works on Hyperhidrosis Treatment

According to Fierce BioTech, a website that covers the biotech industry, "Miami-based Brickell Biotech grabbed $7 million in a new venture round led by a South Korean cosmetics company to back its work on new chemical entities for dermatology." (View article: Cosmetics group leads $7M round for dermatology upstart Brickell)

Fierce BioTech reports: "Brickell's big idea is pushing the fast-paced development of new treatments for acne, atopic dermatitis and hyperhidrosis, better known as excessive sweating. That may not represent the kind of unmet medical need as, say, advanced cancer, but several developers like Allergan ($AGN) have staked out sizable markets for new products in this field. According to the company's website, the biotech in-licensed BBI-4000 for hyperhidrosis late last year." 

Brickell Biotech describes BBI-4000 as a "topical soft anticholingeric for the treatment of hyperhidrosis." SweatHelp.org has a useful web page on anticholingerics, Hyperhidrosis Treatment Medications.
  



Friday, February 22, 2013

Botox everywhere...but who can afford it?

An NBC News Blog recently published an article about various uses for Botox, including treatment of excessive sweat. A woman interviewed for the article had Botox injected in her fingers and on her palms, and the resulting dryness enabled her to get fingerprinted without smearing the ink. Here is a video of such a procedure. I have to admit that I can barely watch it. It looks VERY painful. Some of the people who commented said that they had palmar Botox but it didn't work. Has anyone tried it? If so, please let us know how much it cost, if it worked (and, if so, for how long), and if it was painful.



Love,
Tiara